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“I am a lawyer and represent murderers who face the death penalty – it is intellectually stimulating”

An American lawyer with 42 years of experience representing clients facing the death penalty described his professional experience as “intellectually stimulating” and more like a “game of chess.”

Lee Hollander has been working as a criminal defense attorney for 28 years (WINK News)

A lawyer who has represented murderers sentenced to death has spoken about what it's like to represent someone when their life is on the line.

Lee Hollander, who has worked as a criminal defense attorney for 28 years after serving as a prosecutor for 15 years, describes his job as “intellectually stimulating.” He said his intense efforts in the courtroom are like a “game of chess” when discussing what it takes to handle a potential death penalty trial.

Lee has represented three criminals in court over the past year – Wisner Desmaret, Joseph Zieler and Wade Wilson. Zieler has already been sentenced to death for murdering an 11-year-old girl and her babysitter. Desmaret is serving a life sentence for shooting police officer Adam Jobbers-Miller, and Wilson is awaiting sentencing after being found guilty of brutally strangling two women just hours apart.

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Lee described his experiences in the courtroom as “intellectually stimulating”(WINK News)

In an interview with WINK News, Lee was asked, “Do you ever ask people directly if they did it, or do you want to know? Do you not want to know?” He replied, “Ultimately, you make your own decision regardless of what they tell you.”

“I've been doing this for 42 years, 15 as a prosecutor, 28 as a defense attorney, and it's very intellectually stimulating.” Lee explained that each case requires months of preparation before jury selection.
He explained: “It's like a game of chess. You try to find jurors who you hope will agree with your arguments. If they accept your arguments, the state tries to do the same.”